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Monday, January 28, 2019

I Don’t Have It All Together, and That’s Okay

In review of Romans 12:3 it says, “Do not think of yourself more highly than you ought, but rather think of yourself with sober judgment, in accordance with the faith God has distributed to each of you” (NIV).

Romans 12:3
I am given a warning to not think I am better than I really am. I am to be honest in my evaluation of myself, measuring myself by the faith that God has given me.

A healthy confidence in my worth or abilities is important because I can either think too little of myself or overestimate myself. The key to an honest and accurate self-evaluation is knowing the basis of my self-worth, my identity in Christ. Apart from him, I'm not capable of very much by eternal standards; in him I am valuable and capable of worthy service. Evaluating myself by the wordily standards of success and achievement can cause me to think too much about my worth in the eyes of others and thus miss my true value in God's eyes.

What I’m learning is that the first and greatest barrier to change in any area of my life is pride.

The fact is, nobody has it all together. I don’t have it all together. You don’t have it all together. The Pope doesn’t have it all together. The Bible says nobody is perfect—period. Everyone on this planet is broken because of sin.

But I walk around trying to impress people and pretend like I’ve got it all together. The problem is that if I want lasting change in your life, I first have to humbly assess my current state and admit that I don’t have it all together. I have to admit I have a problem with my finances, my health, or wherever I’m struggling in your life.

Romans 12:3 says, “Do not think of yourself more highly than you ought, but rather think of yourself with sober judgment, in accordance with the faith God has distributed to each of you” (NIV).

Are you willing to ask the people closest to you, “Where do I need to change?” Do you have the courage to ask others to be honest about you and with you?

Why is this so important? Because I can only manage what I measure. If I don’t know the measure of my faith, I can’t grow in my faith. If I don’t know the measure of my health, I can’t develop and grow in health. If I don’t know the measure of where I am financially, I can’t set goals financially. If I don’t know the measure of where I am spiritually or vocationally or relationally, then I can’t grow in those areas. I can only manage what I measure.

It’s also important to record my progress in any goal—whether through a journal or a record or some other tool I want to use. If I’m going to set some health goals, financial goals, or any other kind of goal, record my progress throughout the year so I can measure my growth and my development.

Evaluate where I am, so that I can know where I should go.

Bottom Line:
Be honest in your estimate of yourself, measuring your value by how much faith God has given you.

What this means to me:
Don't think of myself more highly than I ought to. Instead, be modest and reasonable in my thinking, and judge myself according to the amount of faith that God has given me.

In summary, Don't think I am better than I really am. Learn to be honest in my evaluation of myself. The key is knowing the basis of my self-worth, my identity in Christ. The first and greatest barrier to change in any area of my life is pride.

Thank you Father for nice weekend, thank you for helping me get through my and populate my spending plan. I have a few key goals that I need to work through. I also thank you for Father for the reminder on my pride and evaluation of myself. I need to be humble in my actions and in my assessment of myself. I pray this morning Father for your wisdom and guidance in what I do, how I lead and how I interact with others. These things I pray through your Son Jesus name, amen!

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